5 Ingredients For A Brighter Skin

Beauty and Skincare

Now that fall is upon us, we start implementing heavier products into our skincare routines. This is the season that skin starts to take on a more dull tone. We are not exfoliating as much as we were in summer, the heating gets switched, the air is colder and things generally aren’t in our favour for bright skin.

Skincare isn’t about finding a quick fix because it simply doesn’t exist. No, it’s about living a lifestyle that allows confidence, control and healthy skin. In order to maintain blemish free skin (and that is totally possible to achieve) clear skin is a daily commitment.

Healthy skin requires consistent use of the right products, along with conscious lifestyle choices, the right diet, supporting supplements, and good sleep that lead you to achieving your skin goals. In order to get clear, healthy and brighter skin, patience and consistency is key.

Now tell me, is dull skin getting you down? Look no further because the next 5 ingredients all have one thing in common – making your skin brighter! They trigger the epidermis to head into full remodel mode, reducing the appearance of fine lines, smoothing, undulling, and hydrating for renewed radiance.

They brighten the skin by clearing away dull, dry skin to reveeal a fresher appearance, but some earn extra points for the ways they take on excess pigment.

Here is the list of the best 5 ingredients for a brighter skin:

Mandelic Acid

Mandelic acid enhances brightness in two ways. It inhibits the melanin producing enzyme tyrosinase to block pigment from forming. It helps lift existing pigment by exfoliating dead cells from the surface. Mandelic acid has a larger molecular structure than other AHAs, so it is absorbed by the skin more slowly and doesn’t cause irritation that can trigger hyperpigmentation.

It also has antibacterial, antifungal, and anti-inflammatory properties. Mandelic acid is a particulary good choice for skin of color or sensitive types because of its gentle action.

The best products that contain mandelic acid 

The Ordinary Mandelic Acid 10% + HA $7
PCA Skin Pore Refining Treatment $60
Susanne Kaufmann Glow Mask $90

Kojic Acid

Kojic acid is a natural skin lightening compound derived from mushrooms. It works by blocking the production of tyrosinase, the enzyme responsible for melanin synthesis. It also helps exfoliate skin and stimulate cell renewal, which is beneficial for removing existing pigmentation, plus it has photoprotective qualities.

Kojic acid fades dark spots and prevents new pigment formation making it ideal for combatting melasma, hyperpigmentation and age spots.

The best products that contain kojic acid 

SkinCeuticals Discoloration Defense $98
iS Clinical Super Serum Advanced Plus $155
La Roche-Posay Mela-D Pigment Control Serum $53

Glycolic Acid

Glycolic acid disperses pigment on skin’s surface through the sloughing off of dead cells. It also works to directly reduce melanin formation by inhibiting melanin production. In addition to accelerating cell turnover, glycolic acid stimulates collagen production and promotes a smoother texture and more consistent tone.

Because of its small molecular size, glycolic acid penetrates more quickly than other AHAs, so it can be quick to produce results (but don’t expect the overnight results). It can also be more irritating.

The best products that contain glycolic acid 

Mario Badescu Glycolic Skin Renewal Complex $35
Dermalogica Sound Sleep Cocoon $64
Herbivore Botanicals Prism Natural Fruit Acids 5% Exfoliating Glow Potion $62

Ascorbic Acid (Vitamin C)

This antioxidant powerhouse interacts with copper to inhibit the melanin-stimulating enzyme tyrosinase, reducing the formation of pigment and encouraging a brighter, more even tone. It also has a potent photoprotective effect to reduce melanin triggers.

Vitamin C is essential to collagen synthesis, so it supports a firmer skin structure.

The best products that contain vitamin C

Lumene Nordic-C Arctic Berry Oil-Cocktail $25
Drunk Elephant C-Tango Multivitamin Eye Cream $64
Sunday Riley C.E.O Vitamin C Rich Hydration Cream $65

Vitamin A

Vitamin A is converted into retinoic acid in the body where its potent antioxidant properties get to work. It disrupts the oxidative process induced by enviromental stressors to prevent and repair cellular damage. Vitamin A also brightens skin by accelerating cell turnover, which removes surface-level pigmentation.

As a bonus, vitamin A boosts collagen production, thickens, and firms the skin. Vitamin A is often used in combination with other AHA brighteners to maximize results.

The best products that contain Vitamin A

Elizabeth Arden Ceramide Retinol Capsules £39.31


A+ High-Dose Retinoid Serum £70.00
Retinol 0.3% + Vitamin B3 Serum £38.00

Are there any you’re a fan of?

Skin Types – What is My Skin Type?

Beauty and Skincare

Hello all my skin-care addicts and beauty lovers. Today we are going to talk about skin types, how to determine your skin type and the end goal when it comes to healthy skin.

There are four main and basic skin types. They are determined by genetics. You may have heard about other skin types before such as sensitive skin, mature skin, dehydrated skin but these are more skin conditions rather than genetically determined types of skin.

Normal Skin

The luckiest skin type. Also known as “no problem skin”, “you can put anything on me skin”, “I always look perfect and don’t need any filters skin”. Normal skin is usually blemish free, has good oil and water balance and the ultimate goal is to maintain everything and take preventive measures to keep it healthy.

The T-zone (forehead, chin and nose) may be a bit oily, but overall sebum and moisture is balanced and the skin is neither too oily nor too dry.

Normal skin has: fine pores, good blood circulation, a velvety, soft and smooth texture, a fresh, rosy colour uniform transparencyno blemishes  and is not prone to sensitivity.

Combination (Combo) Skin

This skin type can be either oily-normal or oily-dry. The T-zone usually has increased oil production, visible pores, whereas the outer portions are either normal or dry and flakey. In case you are wondering, this is the most common skin type in the world.

The oilier parts of combination skin are caused by an over production of sebum. The drier parts of combination skin are caused by a lack of sebum and a corresponding lipid deficiency.

The goal is to balance the oil and water in the skin. Make sure you are not using too harsh products which can ruin and dry out your skin, leading to increased oil production, dehydration and more dryness as a result.

Dry Skin

Dry is used to describe a skin type that produces less sebum than normal skin. As a result of the lack of sebum, dry skin lacks the lipids that it needs to retain moisture and build a protective shield against external influences. Skin moisture depends on supply of water in the deeper skin layers and on perspiration.

Dry skin is usually sensitive, and may become irritated when in contact with harsh detergents, soaps or unsuitable cosmetic products. When the skin’s barrier function is disturbed, allergens, irritants, pollutants and microorganism can penetrate the skin more easily.

It is important to avoid skincare products that contain irritating ingredients such as perfumes and colourants. Always check that the product has been dermatologically tested on sensitive skin.

Oily Skin

This skin type produces excess oil. Pores are large and visible. Skin is prone to acne due to buildup of oil and dead skin cells that clogs the pores. Fun fact: oily skin can be a sign of severely dehydrated skin. Avoid harsh cleansers because they can dry out your skin leading to more oil production.

A number of issues trigger the over production of sebum: genetics, hormonal changes and imbalances, medication, stress, comedogenic cosmetics (make-up products that cause irritation).

What skin type do you have?